No entry! Art Invasion

In the last years I’ve spotted many, many No entry signs with humorous interventions across the European Cities. And now I am a big fan of this artist!

I can’t handle it! Every time I travel, I am trying to hunt a new No entry sign.
It’s fascinating how imaginative and creative people could be, and how easy you can turn a negative red sign into a masterpiece, revamping the cities!

And today I just noticed that they arrived to Dublin!

This is my collection so far. I will keep on chasing them and will collect them in Section: Street Art Collection: No Entry – Art Invasion

The creator of this movement (there may now be imitators) is Clet Abrahams, a French artist whose been corrupting signs all over Europe for years. More examples can be found on his Facebook page.

Seen any others? Post them here!

Super Reflex! by Ray Bartkus

The Lithuanian-born artist and illustrator Ray Bartkus has created an amazing, almost unreal, mural in the Lithuanian city of Marijampolė designed to use the surface of the water as its true canvas. The artist intentionally painted it upside-down so that the images he depicted would be reflected right-side-up onto the river Šešupė, which flows through the city’s center.

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Impressed by this Mural, I decided to study more about Ray and discovered an awe-inspiring artist.

Among his works I found prints, illustrations, videos, installations, drawings and paintings. The last ones are just amazing. Creating immersive environments, Bartkus’s monumental, figurative paintings embrace and engulf viewers, projecting them into compelling, mysterious domains.

If you find this artist as amazing as I found him, don’t hesitate to visit his webpage: raybartkus.com

Gyory and Osiris – The magic behind the The Old Goat Art Gallery in Hungary

While visiting the enchanting Hungary, we decided to escape from the city and take a day off in a small riverside town in the Pest county. Szentendre is known for its museums, galleries, and artists. Just before the end of a perfect day, we came across with an art shop that drew our attention due to the bright colors behind the window. The Old Goat Art Gallery.

We had the pleasure to meet the owners, the artists Eszter Gyory and Osiris O’Connor, the coolest and most captivating couple I’ve ever met.

Osiris was born in New York City. But his blood is from all over the world, Japan, Jamaica, Miami, Ireland and who knows what other nationality composes his hierarchy. You can see in the way he expresses himself, either talking or artistically, that he enjoys of diversity and different cultures. Osiris is very deep and spiritual; his work is a reflection of his most deeper thoughts. We mainly saw in the gallery his sculptures, magnificent pieces made of mud and different materials such as buttons, beads, pearls, pins, wire and even skulls, real monkey skulls!!!

“I view art as an expression of one’s Inner world.  I chose sculpture as a medium because I like to take a brute object and mold it to it’s finest form of expression” – Osiris

Gyory however, is more focused in painting. She loves exploring different materials but on canvas, such as fibers, acrylics, pigments and textures. I don’t know how to define her style; maybe, “nomad” is a good word because she can’t marry to only one, she changes from one style to another all the time, adapting herself to new materials and technologies. Within the hour we’ve been chatting, we had a journey across her artistic career and her paintings have been mutating throughout the years from flowers, dogs, abstracts, angels, children, self-portraits, and more and more, but all of them, original, super colorful and full of life. She was born in Hungary but lived many years in Miami.

Meeting them was definitely the best of the day. We learned from them, from their stories, from their way of seeing life. We really enjoy of their success and joyful careers. I hope we can be like them someday and inspire to others what they have inspired to us.

Abstract Expressionism – Cool Contemporary paintings by Linda O’Neill (@AbbyCreekArt)

Surfing the web, I came across with some abstract paintings that really caught out my attention, mainly because of the bright colors, the perfect and balanced composition and the different materials used.

Investigating a little bit, I discovered AbbyCreekStudios. Linda is a Californian artist who for the past 17 years devoted herself to abstract expressionism. Her creative voice expresses herself in different ways; bending and shaping using acrylic paint, collage, ink and whatever else she can get her hands on. She really knows how to let her mind to fly!

She works on canvas, paper and wood. The last ones are my favourites!

This is my top 10:

Cool German art by Matthias Weischer

Matthias Weischer is a German painter who has lived and worked in Leipzig since 1995. He is considered to be one of the most talented members of the new Leipzig school, a loose assembly of artists whose works are regarded as the next generation in the rich history of German painting. However, there is no doubt that Weischer’s works stand out as unique. He called my attention because his cool works oscillate between abstract and figurative painting.

Until 2006, his paintings depicted deserted interiors like stage settings that are infused by abstract elements. Furniture, everyday objects and large-scale ornaments stylistically refer to the 1950s and 1960s. In their collage-like appearance they establish a complex and ambiguous relationship.

During his residency in Rome in 2007, Weischer concentrated on drawing and studies on nature and landscape. Since then, he predominantly works on and with paper, in smaller formats and with a lighter range of colours. He also explores different printing techniques and, recently, three-dimensional sculptural arrangements.

His work has been exhibited worldwide. If you want to know more about this artist please visit his webpage: http://www.matthiasweischer.de/en/2014.html

The mystery of NemO’s (@whoisnemos)

NemO’s is a super talented and mysterious Italian artist. He has a unique style and a special social sensibility that makes him one of my favorites muralists.

His work is divided into essential and graphic images, with a social message and made up characters that carry out poetic and surreal actions like characters in who knows which fairy tale. He uses different techniques on his murals, from traditional acrylic and spray to recycled paper stick on the wall replacing the color by the paper’s texture.

“I started to realize that drawings are very powerful because they are universal and this way you can defeat the language barrier.” – NemO’s

NemO’s masterpieces  are around the world! Below you can find a selection of my preferred murals.

“BEFORE and AFTER” is his latest work. It’s a new project on the interaction of people and time on a drawing

“NemO’s piece of art “Before and After” shifts the consideration and the use of Street Art, focusing on the interaction of the audience and the friction of time. NemO’S, on one hand, works site specific like other artists, and on the other hand experiments and carries out an innovative technique. After the first layer of paint, NemO’S covers the surface with a layer of glue and then places pieces of newspaper, covering the image that is underneath. On top of the layers of newspaper he adds a second illustration (clothes, skin, casings and different details ecc.). This way the artist dresses the first image with volatile clothing that is destined to detach in time and endure the people passing by! The artistic and technical innovation lays in the cohesion of the pieces of newspaper (that the artist recycles from daily newspapers), until these come unstuck and reveal new meanings connected to the drawing, leaving the audience floored and actually including the audience in the creation of the new image. With the consideration and the realization of NemO’S process Street Art shifts from being a mere visual reality to one with aspects regarding participation and tactile effects. This way as time goes by and a random audience passes by, in some way interacting, the piece of art is completed, one that had only just began with the hands of the artist. NemO’S fresh new idea lays in the use of this technique that, like a drawer of secrets, needs intuition, collaboration, consideration and that satisfies the sixth sense: curiosity”

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For more information about this artist, visit his webpage and find out whoisnemos?

Anamorphic illusions – Green art by Bernard Pras

Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor. He is known for creating mind-boggling anamorphic illusions. His pallet consists of found objects, wood, textiles and plastic toys. He makes use of everything that has the right color!

Take a look at this video and you will be amazed by his Job!

His latest installation is at Le palais idéal in Hauterives, France. When viewed from the right perspective, a seemingly random pile of trash is revealed to be an enormous sculptural portrait of Ferdinand Cheval. To create this masterpiece he used discarded and broken chairs, boards, figurines, and other items. Looking at each individual component and its precise placement in the overall portrait, one can’t help but marvel at the artist’s eye for perspective and his painstaking assembly of the piece.

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The French artist force us to re-examine the way we look at visual art – which is itself a prism through which the artist channels a unique way of translating thoughts, emotions and ways of interpreting the world around us.

Stenciling the streets with Martin Whatson

Martin Whatson is a Norwegian born and based stencil artist. While studying Art and Graphic design at Westerdals School of Communication, Oslo, he discovered stencils and the urban art scene. After following graffiti and its development, he started his own stencil production 10 years ago in the winter of 2004.

Martin has a continuous urge to search for beauty in what is commonly dismissed as ugly, out of style or simply left behind. He looks for inspirations in people, city landscapes, old buildings, graffiti, posters and decaying walls. This interest for decay has helped develop his style, motives and composition and he enjoys creating either unity or conflict between materials, backgrounds, motives and human intervention. His artistic expression started more political, but has developed into a more subtle expression blending graffiti, stencil art and decay together. Inspired by artist like Jose Parlá and Cy Twombly. His abstract graffiti and stencils are a mix of urban scenes showing the development of a walls lifetime. He use grey tones as a basis but add’s vibrant colours to break the monochrome concrete expression and bring a splash of life to his motives. Since his artistic debut in 2004, he has had several solo shows and participated in many group exhibitions, both nationally and in international metropoles like Tokyo, Paris, London, New York and Los Angeles.

If you want to know more about this great artist, visit his webpage: http://martinwhatson.com/

This Goddess of Art really got Talent – Kseniya Simonova

Yesterday night my boyfriend showed me an incredible video about a sand animation. I decided to do some research on the artist and discovered #Kseniya #Simonova (@kseniyasimonova) This lady is the 2009 winner of the TV contest Ukraine’s Got Talent. She is a performance artist in sand animation and a philanthropist. I think her work is incredible and very original!

Sand performance was suggested by her husband. Initially, Simonova was unsure, but she decided to try it in the absence of other viable options to improve their financial situation. When tests with beach and river sands proved both unsuitable, Simonova’s husband began researching better options on the internet. He sold his printing equipment to buy 3 kilograms of expensive volcanic sand.
Simonova began experimenting with the medium at night, after serving as a full-time mother throughout the day. She found it challenging, but persisted in spite of early impulses to give up. Physically grueling, the art form required her standing for long periods of time and also required her to retrain her vision to adapt to the unique medium.

The sand story Kseniya presented live on TV was an eight minute story of a young couple separated by the war. She was hoping to get some exposure as an artist, but it became much more. The audience was moved to tears. As soon as she finished her performance, applause erupted and she received a standing ovation. Check her performance here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=518XP8prwZo

This Goddess of Art has more than 200 sand animations but in this opportunity I would like to introduce to you one of my favorites “Beautiful Morocco”