Super Reflex! by Ray Bartkus

The Lithuanian-born artist and illustrator Ray Bartkus has created an amazing, almost unreal, mural in the Lithuanian city of Marijampolė designed to use the surface of the water as its true canvas. The artist intentionally painted it upside-down so that the images he depicted would be reflected right-side-up onto the river Šešupė, which flows through the city’s center.

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Impressed by this Mural, I decided to study more about Ray and discovered an awe-inspiring artist.

Among his works I found prints, illustrations, videos, installations, drawings and paintings. The last ones are just amazing. Creating immersive environments, Bartkus’s monumental, figurative paintings embrace and engulf viewers, projecting them into compelling, mysterious domains.

If you find this artist as amazing as I found him, don’t hesitate to visit his webpage: raybartkus.com

Travelling with the lens to Belgium

Becasue Brussels and Bruges are probably the most well known cities in Belgium, we decided to stay in Ghent. It’s a student city and always vibrant and alive. Simply beautiful, cool and full of design, architecture and history. Every single shop, even the butchers, were full of design!!!

Curiosity: The Lonely Planet has called the city “Europe’s best kept secret” and a must see destination for 2011 and the National Geographic Traveler Magazine has listed this city as the most authentic historic city in the world and full of life.

Guided by the locals, we found the little graffiti street! While graffiti is of course prohibited in Ghent, the city makes a couple of exceptions, and the Werregarenstraat is one of them. Street art used to be a major problem in Ghent so the government commissioned off one small avenue specifically to be used for artists. The graffiti alley, between Hoogpoort and Onderstraat, it’s a shady but colourful place where street artists can let themselves go. The appearance of the Werregarenstraat changes constantly, and this is how we found it last weekend

Bruges is beautiful as well but much more expensive and touristy.

Photos by Luli Marin and Gonzalozawa

Visit also: Street Art around the World and Travelling with the Lense

The mystery of NemO’s (@whoisnemos)

NemO’s is a super talented and mysterious Italian artist. He has a unique style and a special social sensibility that makes him one of my favorites muralists.

His work is divided into essential and graphic images, with a social message and made up characters that carry out poetic and surreal actions like characters in who knows which fairy tale. He uses different techniques on his murals, from traditional acrylic and spray to recycled paper stick on the wall replacing the color by the paper’s texture.

“I started to realize that drawings are very powerful because they are universal and this way you can defeat the language barrier.” – NemO’s

NemO’s masterpieces  are around the world! Below you can find a selection of my preferred murals.

“BEFORE and AFTER” is his latest work. It’s a new project on the interaction of people and time on a drawing

“NemO’s piece of art “Before and After” shifts the consideration and the use of Street Art, focusing on the interaction of the audience and the friction of time. NemO’S, on one hand, works site specific like other artists, and on the other hand experiments and carries out an innovative technique. After the first layer of paint, NemO’S covers the surface with a layer of glue and then places pieces of newspaper, covering the image that is underneath. On top of the layers of newspaper he adds a second illustration (clothes, skin, casings and different details ecc.). This way the artist dresses the first image with volatile clothing that is destined to detach in time and endure the people passing by! The artistic and technical innovation lays in the cohesion of the pieces of newspaper (that the artist recycles from daily newspapers), until these come unstuck and reveal new meanings connected to the drawing, leaving the audience floored and actually including the audience in the creation of the new image. With the consideration and the realization of NemO’S process Street Art shifts from being a mere visual reality to one with aspects regarding participation and tactile effects. This way as time goes by and a random audience passes by, in some way interacting, the piece of art is completed, one that had only just began with the hands of the artist. NemO’S fresh new idea lays in the use of this technique that, like a drawer of secrets, needs intuition, collaboration, consideration and that satisfies the sixth sense: curiosity”

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For more information about this artist, visit his webpage and find out whoisnemos?

Stenciling the streets with Martin Whatson

Martin Whatson is a Norwegian born and based stencil artist. While studying Art and Graphic design at Westerdals School of Communication, Oslo, he discovered stencils and the urban art scene. After following graffiti and its development, he started his own stencil production 10 years ago in the winter of 2004.

Martin has a continuous urge to search for beauty in what is commonly dismissed as ugly, out of style or simply left behind. He looks for inspirations in people, city landscapes, old buildings, graffiti, posters and decaying walls. This interest for decay has helped develop his style, motives and composition and he enjoys creating either unity or conflict between materials, backgrounds, motives and human intervention. His artistic expression started more political, but has developed into a more subtle expression blending graffiti, stencil art and decay together. Inspired by artist like Jose Parlá and Cy Twombly. His abstract graffiti and stencils are a mix of urban scenes showing the development of a walls lifetime. He use grey tones as a basis but add’s vibrant colours to break the monochrome concrete expression and bring a splash of life to his motives. Since his artistic debut in 2004, he has had several solo shows and participated in many group exhibitions, both nationally and in international metropoles like Tokyo, Paris, London, New York and Los Angeles.

If you want to know more about this great artist, visit his webpage: http://martinwhatson.com/

POSE and REVOK – Uphill Both Ways (@JLeVineGallery)

Jonathan Levine gallery presented an exhibition titled Uphill Both Ways in NY

It is a two-person exhibition curated by Roger Gastman, featuring new works by Chicago-based artist Pose and Detroit-based artist Revok. In conjunction with their first show in New York, the artists also collaborated on a large-scale mural on the famed Goldman Properties wall located on Houston and Bowery streets, in lower Manhattan.

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Although style, medium and techniques vary between the two artists, their work is strongly connected from a conceptual standpoint.
Pose’s works reference disparate sources—pop and comic art, skateboard and advertising graphics, collage, sign painting and graffiti. Painting portraits of the human condition, he re-appropriates the visual language of the street and overwhelming experience of consumer culture to convey a broad spectrum of emotions—pain, triumph, joy, fear, love and loss. His fragmented imagery is intended to disarm pretense, making the work universally accessible and open to interpretation. Revok creates abstract geometric panels with vibrant colors and striking patterns using found materials sourced from abandoned homes, schools, businesses and churches—sampling bits and pieces of people’s lives, hopes, dreams and aspirations—reinterpreted through rich layers of history, decay and age-worn patina.

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This new video by Sam Lipman-Stern catches up with the two artists as they explain the similarities in their creative process and their inspiration for this exhibition.

Loving Banksy! @yksnab

“There is absolutely no reason for doing this show at all,” he told the Voice. “I know street art can feel increasingly like the marketing wing of an art career, so I wanted to make some art without the price tag attached. There’s no gallery show or book or film. It’s pointless. Which hopefully means something.” —Banksy to the Village Voice

For the past month of October 2013, street artist Banksy hosted a residency on the streets of New York. During this time, he put up one new piece every day, joined Instagram to share them, stressed out the NYPD, and exposed a strong divide between the Banksy fans and haters.

Banksy may be leaving New York now that October has come and gone (or maybe he’s not?), but we don’t want to forget the questions he raised, the social aspects he made us rethink, and the laughs he provided. Relive the month with this Timeline of Every Piece From Banksy’s “Better Out Than In” New York Residency.

Exhibitions: “Better Out Than In” in New York